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Porin McDonald’s-ravintola palvelee autoilijoita entistä paremmin: autokaistojen palvelu nopeutuu ja sähköautoilijoille tarjolla moderni suurteholaturi

Porin McDonald’s-ravintolan autokaista sulkeutuu reilun viikon kestävän remontin ajaksi 10.5.2021. Autokaista voi olla remontin aikana hetkittäin poissa käytöstä, mutta ravintola palvelee muuten myös remontin aikana. Pysäköintipaikalle asennettu uusi suurteholaturi palvelee sähköautoilijoita jo nyt.

Remontissa Porin McDonald’s-ravintolaan tulee kahden tilauspisteen autokaistat, mikä nopeuttaa autokaistan asiakaspalvelua. Lisäksi autokaistalle asennetaan samalla digitaaliset menutaulut.

”Autokaistojemme suosio on viime vuosina kasvanut merkittävästi, ja uudistamalla niitä haluamme tarjota asiakkaillemme entistä paremman asiakaskokemuksen. Kehittämällä jatkuvasti palveluitamme varmistamme, että palvelemme asiakkaitamme parhaalla mahdollisella tavalla”, kertoo McDonald’s-yrittäjä Johanna Junkkari.

Suurteholaturi palvelee sähköautoilijoita

Porin McDonald’sin pysäköintialueella on otettu käyttöön sähköautoilijoita palveleva Rechargen suurteholatauslaitteisto. Kyseessä on kotimaisen Kempowerin uuden teknologian latauslaitteisto, joka mahdollistaa useamman auton saman aikaisen lataamisen sekä dynaamisen tehonjaon latauspisteiden välillä. Laitteisto on varustettu neljällä CCS-latauspistoolilla, ja sen yhteisteho on 300kW. Tyypillinen latausaika suurteholaturilla on 15–20 minuuttia, joten sähköauton lataus onnistuu helposti ruokailun aikana. Latauksen voi käynnistää muun muassa Fortum Charge & Drive- tai Plugsurfing-sovelluksilla ja RFID-tunnisteella sekä jäsenyysvapaasti tekstiviestillä tai QR-koodia käyttämällä.

Lisätietoja

McDonald’s-yrittäjä Johanna Junkkari, puh. +358 400 417 848, johanna.junkkari (at) fi.mcd.com

Viestintäjohtaja Heli Ryhänen, puh. +358 40 501 7179, heli.ryhanen (at) fi.mcd.com

Maajohtaja Sami Saarilahti, Recharge, +358 40 757 2880, sami.saarilahti (at) rechargeinfra.com

McDonald’s on yksi maailman tunnetuimmista tuotemerkeistä. Tuttu kaarikuvio kohoaa yli 100 maassa, yhteensä noin 37 000 ravintolan tunnuksena. McDonald’s palvelee päivittäin noin 70 miljoonaa asiakasta. Maailmanlaajuisesti ketjun palveluksessa työskentelee 1,7 miljoonaa työntekijää. Suomen ensimmäinen McDonald’s avattiin yli 35 vuotta sitten vuonna 1984. Tällä hetkellä Suomessa on 66 McDonald’s-ravintolaa. McDonald’s ravintoloiden yhteenlaskettu verollinen myynti oli 218,7 M€ vuonna 2020. Kasvua oli edelliseen vuoteen verrattuna yli 6 %. Ravintoloista 56 eli noin 85 % on yksityisten lisenssinhaltijoiden eli yrittäjien omistuksessa. Yrittäjiä on yhteensä 12. 

The difference between EV chargers

Do you find it difficult to remember which type of charger you normally use, should use or cannot use? Here is the overview you need to choose the right charger for your EV!

Why is it really so important to choose the right EV charger? Well, there are two good reasons for that. Firstly, it will cost you much less if you choose the right charger for the right use and EV model. Secondly, you contribute to reducing waiting times at charging stations – and that’s something we all really appreciate when we are on the go. Especially if we are in a bit of a hurry and “just need a little” top-off.

The different types of charger

At our charging stations, you can choose between three types of chargers; slow charger, rapid charger and high speed charger. They all have different properties and will provide different charging power.Remember that it is ultimately your EV that determines how much electricity you can receive. This means that even if you use a high speed charger, it is not certain that you will get the full benefit if your battery does not have the capacity for that level of charging speed.

If you are unsure of the type of charger that fits your EV, we recommend that you contact the manufacturer. Most EV manufacturers have clear information on their websites.

Slow Charger

Slow chargers are the original EV charger, and the first type of charger we installed. Today, this may not be the charger we prefer most often, but on the other hand, there is seldom a charging queue! Slow chargers are perfect when you have a lot of time. If you are going to the cinema, on a longer shopping trip or on a visit.

Slow chargers are often found in car parks. If there are rapid or high power chargers in the same place, you will probably find a slow charger a short distance away from the others.

To use a slow charger, you must have your own charging cable with a Type 2 connector. The charging power varies from 3.6 to 22 kW. And depending on the make and model of your EV, we estimate a charging time of 3–10 hours, giving you plenty of time for both the cinema and your shopping trip.

Rapid charger

Rapid chargers are an efficient way to charge your EV – under optimal conditions. By optimal conditions for an EV battery, we mean that it is temperate (not too hot or too cold) and that the battery is neither flat nor fully charged. Remember that the charger will always give the charging effect it is marked with, and it is the EV that limits the charging speed.

Rapid chargers usually have two fixed cables (CHAdeMO and CCS). Only one EV can charge at a time, unless there is also an AC outlet/cable – then this can be used in addition. If you arrive at a charging station that has a free cable for fast charging, but it lacks an AC outlet/cable, you will not be able to charge if another EV is charging with the other cable.

Most fast rapid chargers deliver a charging speed of 50 kW, and we estimate charging times of 15–120 minutes, depending on the make and model of your EV, the required amount of power and the condition of the battery.

High speed charger

High speed chargers are our fastest charging option! These chargers deliver charging speeds from 150 to 350 kW, and we estimate that you can cover your charging needs in 10–45 minutes! How fast a high speed chargers will charge your EV is of course also related to the make and model of your EV, and the type and charge level of the battery.

Our high speed chargers have two charging cables, so more cars can charge at the same time. We also have high speed chargers with several associated “satellites”, and all of them can be used at the same time. Some satellites provide more power than others. If there are several available, check which one best suits your EV. The power output is marked on all the satellites.

What is the difference between a rapid charger and high speed chargers?

Frequently asked questions

  • Why does my EV charge slower in the winter?

    Fast charging takes longer when the battery is cold. This simply has to do with battery chemistry; the ions move more slowly when the battery pack is cold than they do when it is warm. The cold does not affect the charging station itself. The charger provides the same power as it is marked with. It is the car’s battery management system that limits the charging speed to protect the battery.

    Tips! In order to speed up charging in cold weather, it may make sense to charge the EV when the battery is warm. For example, plan a charging stop towards the end of your trip.

     

  • Which charging cable fits my EV?

    There are several types of charging cables, and at many stations, you will be able to choose between several charging options.

    For slow charging you must always bring your own mode 3 type 2 charging cable that fits your EV. This is usually standard equipment on all new EVs. EVs normally come with two cables. You cannot use the charging cable that has a “normal” wall connector at our public charging stations.

    For fast chargers and high power chargers there are always fixed cables, and at most charging stations, you will find both a CCS/Combo connector and a CHAdeMO connector. Only one of them will fit your car. Most new EVs today come with CCS, which is the European standard for charging cables. Read about the different charging cables here..

  • Why am I not getting more power?

    How much power you get over a given time, i.e. the charging speed, depends on several things, including which EV model you have, what kind of charging station you charge at, battery temperature and the vehicle’s battery level.

    It is always the vehicle that decides how much power it can receive! It is the vehicle’s battery management system that limits the charging speed, to protect the battery.

    For example: An EV that cannot charge at higher power than 40 kW will not be able to get more than 40 kW – even if the charger has a maximum charging speed of 150 kW.

    All our charging stations are marked with their maximum charging speed. So, be aware that even if your EV can receive a charging speed of 150 kW, it will never be able to draw more power than what the charging station is marked with.

My first long drive in an EV

Are you setting out on your very first long trip in an EV? Here are some things to keep in mind.

As a new EV driver, there can be a lot of new things you need to get acquainted with. Many people hesitate to take that first long trip by EV, and charging and range can be particularly concerning. But don’t despair! The time when you had to worry about range on long drives is long gone. See map of all 

See map of all our charging stations in the Nordic region.

Still, it is a good idea to be prepared before your trip, so here are our best tips for your first long drive:

  • Temperature affects the battery – There is a big difference between summer and winter when you travel long distances by EV. In summer, the range is longer and charging times are shorter.
  • Charge when you stop, don’t stop to charge Charge where you have planned to stop anyway. Are you planning to buy food? Many grocery stores and shopping centres have fast charging stations. Charge while you shop!
  • You don’t always have to fully charge – A nearly flat battery charges slowly at first to protect the battery. Smart driving involves charging a little more often, because several short charging stops are more efficient than long stops to fully charge a flat battery.
  • Always start the day with a full “tank” Yes. There are many charging stations out there, and it is easy to charge along the way. You can easily skip a charging stop even with only a quarter of battery power left. But you will quickly fall behind if you don’t start with a fully charged battery in the morning.
  • Don’t charge more than 80 per cent Your car charges very slowly from 80 to 100 per cent. So, it can be good to show consideration for others, and not charge to more than 80 per cent if there is a queue behind you. You should rather drive a few more hours and charge your EV again.
  • Fast charging – You charge most efficiently when the battery is warm and low on power. So, you should avoid fast charging after your EV has been parked overnight in the cold.
  • Efficient charging – Fast charging will be more efficient after you drive a few dozen kilometres, or after some charging with a slow charger.

Plan your trip well – Consult our map of chargers before you leave.

Frequently asked questions

  • What is the difference between kW and kWh?

    Kilowatt (kW) corresponds to charging power// speed.

    Kilowatt hours (kWh) are probably familiar from your electricity bill: A kWh is the unit for the amount of energy you have received/used.

    For example: A charger that provides 50 kW of power, will under ideal conditions deliver 50 kWh of energy in one hour.

  • What is the difference between a slow charger, a rapid charger and a high power charger?

    The three types of charger say something about charging power/speed, i.e. how long it takes the charger to supply power to the EV. Not all EVs can utilize the charger’s maximum charging speed. If you are unsure about which charging type is suitable for your EV, you can check with your vehicle supplier.

    • Slow charger: 3.6–22 kW. Estimated charging time (80 per cent) 3–10 hours.
    • Rapid charger: 50–150 kW. Estimated charging time (depending on battery level) 15–120 minutes.
    • High power charger: Over 150 kW. Estimated charging time (depending on battery level) 10–45 minutes.
  • Why am I not getting more power?

    How much power you get over a given time, i.e. the charging speeddepends on several things, including which EV model you have, what kind of charging station you charge at, battery temperature and the vehicle’s battery level.

    It is always the vehicle that decides how much power it can receive! It is the vehicle’s battery management system that limits the charging speed, to protect the battery.

    For example: An EV that cannot charge at higher power than 40 kW will not be able to draw more than 40 kW – even if the charger has a maximum charging speed of 150 kW. 

    All our charging stations are marked with their maximum charging speed. So, be aware that even if your EV can receive a charging speed of 150 kW, it will never be able to draw more power than what the charging station is marked with.

How to prepare for a long drive with children in the car.

Are you going on a long trip with the whole family? Driving long distances with children in the car can be a challenge for young and old alike. Here are some tips on how to best prepare for your trip, and not least make it fun along the way!

If you are going on a long trip with children, it is a good idea to pack refreshments for the drive. Make packed lunches, and bring along some snacks and chopped fruit. Then you can take an ice cream break while you charge your EV. You may want to consult our map of chargers before you leave, and plan breaks based on your charging needs. Audiobooks are also a good tip, and Pickatale, Spotify, Fabel and Storytel all have great stories for children.

Even with audiobooks, however, your little ones may still get bored on long road trips, but fun games can come to the rescue.

Here are 11 tips for fun activities for the whole family on a road trip

 

1. The who or what game

Mum or Dad thinks of a person or an animal. The children have to take turns guessing and asking clever yes-or-no questions.

2. Food ABCs

One of you starts by saying a food that begins with the letter A. “I want to eat an apple.” The next person must remember what the first person said, and then say something that starts with the letter B: “I want to eat an apple and a banana.” The next person must then find food that begins with the letter C: “I want to eat an apple, a banana and a cheeseburger.” Can you make it through the entire alphabet? Educational and fun!

3. Counting cars

In this game, everyone in the car must choose a colour, e.g. white, blue or red. Then you count how many cars you see in your colour. The first person to get to twenty cars in their colour wins. You can also allow each participant to count multiple colours. And you can make it even harder by only counting cars of a particular brand.

4. The letter game

In this game, you first agree on a theme (movies, band names, car names, celebrities etc.), and the first person starts by saying a name or word within this category. The next person must then find a new name or word that starts with the last letter of the previous participant’s word.

5. Quiz

There are many different quiz books available with different levels of difficulty and themes, so it is not hard to find quizzes for every taste and age. You can also make a simple quiz yourself, or find one online. Take simple notes on your mobile to keep score: everyone likes to know who is leading and, of course, who wins in the end.

7. Counting diggers and tractors

If the children are small enough, counting the number of diggers and tractors along the road can be fun enough.

8. First one to see…

One of the adults says: “First one to see a... blue car / round sign / caravan / red house” and so on.

9. Car bingo

Classic car bingo requires some simple preparations. Before you leave, you can make some bingo cards with things you are likely to see during your trip. For example, a lorry, a cow, a cyclist, a red house, a flagpole etc. You can also draw pictures on the cards. The first person to cross everything off on their card wins. You can also buy ready-made car bingo cards.

10. My ship is loaded with

You choose a letter of the alphabet to start with, for example B. The first person says something like: “My ship is loaded with Bananas.” Then the next person has to find something that starts with the next letter of the alphabet.

11. I spy

“I spy with my little eye something that is green.” Who can guess the thing first? You can take turns and give each passenger the chance to challenge themselves to be creative and try to make it difficult for the others to guess. Or maybe the one who guesses correctly gets to go next?

Charging stops along the road

When you are on a trip with your EV, you also need to include some stops along the way. Breaks are good for young and old alike, and when you do have to stop and charge, you may want to combine your stop with other things such as a snack, toilet break or some physical activity. Bring a couple of skipping ropes or soap bubbles for the kids – combined with an ice cream in the sun, it is guaranteed to be popular. Or how about bringing some chalk and drawing hopscotch on the pavement? Make your journey part of the experience, and make charging a pleasant break. This will make the trip seem both shorter and more fun for everyone.

Can I high power charge my EV?

We are installing more and more high power chargers in our network, and 2021 will be the big high power charger year. Do you know if your EV can benefit from the full effect of a high power charger?

High power chargers are built to meet the needs of the new generations of EVs. They are quite simply designed to provide the most power in the shortest possible time, which suits most people especially well in an otherwise hectic day. One minute here, and one minute there.

Factors that affect charging speed

Charging at high speed cargers sounds fantastic. But did you know that it is the EV and not the charger that determines the maximum power you receive when you charge? It’s actually the EVs battery management system that controls voltage and temperature, as well as the power that the battery can receive, and in turn, the maximum charging speed.

Charging speed of 350 kW

Today, many EVs on Norwegian roads can charge at a maximum of 50 or 100 kW – i.e. rapid charging. And high power chargers have charging speeds over 150 kW – and up to 350 kW! Older EV models and some small vehicles will not be able to take advantage of the high power of a rapid charger. 

They can still charge on a rapid charger but will receive a lower power than stated on the charger.

There are several variables that determine whether a high power charger is right for your EV. If your EV has a CHAdeMO connector, for example, you cannot charge at rapid speeds. This is because the highest charging speed for CHAdeMO in our network is 62.5 kW. If you have a newer EV with a CCS connector, on the other hand, there is a good chance that your EV can charge at rapid speeds.

Check your EV model to see which type of charging suits you best.

Read more

The difference between EV chargers

Do you find it difficult to remember which type of charger you normally use, should use or cannot use? Here is the overview you need to choose the right charger for your EV!

Read more east

What is the difference between a rapid charger and high speed chargers?

It’s Friday afternoon and you’re on your way to the mountains. Both your passengers and your EV are low on energy, and you want to arrive at the cabin before it is too late. Should you choose a fast charger or a rapid charger?

Potentially seven times the charging speed

Rapid chargers provide higher power charging, i.e. faster / speed. A rapid charger, with 350 kW, will potentially be able to charge an EV at seven times the speed of a fast charger with a maximum charging speed of 50 kW.

It should be easy to recognise the different types of chargers at our charging stations. All charging stations are clearly marked with maximum charging speed and type of charger (normal, fast, or rapid) both at the charger and on our digital map of chargers.

Most of our fast chargers deliver a charging speed of max 50 kW, and we estimate charging times of 15 to 120 minutes, depending on vehicle type and battery level. A rapid charger can deliver charging speeds from 150 to 350 kW, and we estimate charging times of 10 to 45 minutes, depending on vehicle type and needs.

Actual charging speeds are limited by your vehicle

So, you are standing at a charging station on the way to the cabin and wondering what will get you back on the road fastest, the rapid charger or the fast charger. However, it is not actually the type of charger alone that determines how fast your battery will charge – it also depends on the make and model of your vehicle.

How fast an EV can charge is limited by how much power it can receive. For example, if you have a 30 kWh Nissan Leaf, it will be limited to be able to handle a maximum charging speed of 50 kW. EV manufacturers are constantly coming up with new models that can charge at a similar or higher power.

Faster charging speeds cost more

It is usually more expensive to use a rapid charger than a fast charger. You will be able to receive as much power as on a fast charger, but because the power is delivered faster, a rapid charge costs more. There are also higher operating and maintenance costs associated with delivering power faster.

If your EV can charge on a rapid charger, it will of course go faster, but it will also cost a little more. If you choose the fast charger, it may take a little longer, but you can stretch your legs a bit and prepare for the rest of the ride.

See our prices

Frequently asked questions

  • What is the difference between kW and kWh?

    Kilowatt (kW) corresponds to charging power/speed.

    Kilowatt hours are probably familiar from your electricity bill: A kWh is the unit for the amount of energy you have received/used.

    For example: A charger that provides 50 kW of power, will under ideal conditions deliver 50 kWh of energy in one hour. 

  • What is the difference between a slow charger, a rapid charger and a high power charger?

    The three types of charger say something about charging power/speed, i.e. how long it takes the charger to supply power to the EV. Not all EVs can utilize the charger’s maximum charging speed. If you are unsure about which charging type is suitable for your EV, you can check with your vehicle supplier.

    • Slow charger: 3.6–22 kW. Estimated charging time (80 per cent) 3–10 hours.
    • Rapid charger: 50–150 kW. Estimated charging time (depending on battery level) 15–120 minutes.
    • High power charger: Over 150 kW. Estimated charging time (depending on battery level) 10–45 minutes.
  • Why does my EV charge slower in the winter?

    Fast charging takes longer when the battery is cold. This simply has to do with battery chemistry; the ions move more slowly when the battery pack is cold than they do when it is warm. The cold does not affect the charging station itself. The charger provides the same power as it is marked with. It is the car’s battery management system that limits the charging speed to protect the battery.

    Useful tips: In order to speed up charging in cold weather, it may make sense to charge the EV while the battery is warm. For example, plan a charging stop towards the end of your trip.

How open and closed charging networks work

A network of chargers is operated by a charge point operator. In an open network, the charge point operator offers one or more e-mobility service providers. This makes charging more flexible because you can choose the provider you want.

Charge point operator and e-mobility service provider

A network of chargers is operated by a charge point operator. The charge point operator’s task is to maintain, operate and upgrade the charging stations. Recharge is a charge point operator, and we have several hundred charging stations throughout the Nordic region. 

Charge point operators usually offer a payment method where you don’t need to register as a customer, such as our drop-in methods, , where you can pay by SMS or with a QR code.

We also give others the opportunity to sell their charging services through our charging stations. We call them e-mobility service providersE-mobility service providers offer services that allow EV drivers to pay and start charging at our charging stations. These service providers set their own prices, terms and conditions, and most offer payment with an app or an RFID card or key fob.

CPO & EMP

CPO stands for charge point operator.
EMP stands for E-Mobility Service Provider

Integrated network

Most offer an RFID card or key fob or payment via an app. In Norway you can also use RFID tags from the Norwegian Automobile Association (NAF) and the Norwegian Electric Vehicle Association in our network, but then you must first register a member profile with the company in question.

 

Open network

In an open network, the charge point operator offers one or more e-mobility service providers. Then, EV drivers can choose between different e-mobility service providers and are thus free to choose who they want to buy electricity from when they charge. You can either pay using our drop-in service or by registering as a customer with one of our e-mobility service providers.

Most offer an RFID card or key fob or payment via an app.

Examples of open networks: Ionity (offers rapid charging only) or Recharge (we charge all EV models).

Why am I not getting more power from a rapid charger?

A rapid charger will always try to deliver maximum power, but the EV’s battery management system determines the charging speed.

All EVs have a battery management system(BMS).The battery management system is the unit that controls voltage, current and temperature. The battery management system also determines how fast the vehicle will charge, i.e. the charging speed. It does this to protect the battery as much as possible. 

During a charging session, the battery management system continuously communicates with the charger to tell it how much power it should provide. EVs don’t charge at the same charging speed for the entire charging session, so if the battery is too cold/hot, or is nearly fully charged, fast chargers won’t charge very quickly.

Psst! If the charger is marked with a maximum of 150 kW, and your EV battery can charge at 350 kW, the charger will never provide more than 150 kW.

Our charging speeds

The charging speed says something about how fast the battery will charge. We measure this in kW (kilowatts). All our charging stations are marked with their maximum power. Find your nearest fast charger on our map of charging stations.

  • Slow chargers have a maximum power of 3–22 kW.
  • Rapid chargers have a maximum power from 50 kW.
  • High speed chargers have a maximum power of 150 kW and up.
Check our map of charging stations to find the one nearest you

This is what happens in the battery when you charge

When you charge an EV battery, positive lithium ions are pushed over to a negative electrode until it is full. When the battery approaches a full charge, space also becomes cramped. Then, the electrode takes longer to free up space for the lithium ions that are on their way over.

This is the reason why the charging speed is reduced when you have reached a certain voltage level in the battery cells, usually when the battery is between 70 and 80 per cent charged.

The temperature for optimal battery charging is between 20–24 °C. Charging speed will drop if the temperature is too low or too high. When it is cold, the lithium ions will move more slowly in the electrolyte. 

The electrochemical processes are also sensitive to high temperatures; even at the same charging power, the voltage in the battery pack could become higher than at more ideal temperatures. This could damage the cells, so the battery management system must reduce the charging speed.

Fortum sold the majority of Recharge

Fortum is once again accelerating the pace of development of EV charging stations – this time together with its new partner Infracapital.

Fortum is accelerating the pace of development of EV charging stations

- “Fortum has already decided to quadruple the development of public charging stations from 2019 to 2020 alone, and now we can invest even more heavily in building this socially critical infrastructure moving forward,” said Annika Hoffner, CEO of Fortum Recharge AS. 

In April 2020, Fortum signed an agreement to sell a majority share of Fortum Recharge AS, the company’s network of public charging stations for EVs, to Infracapital, the infrastructure equity investment arm of M&G Plc. The new company changed its name in the autumn of 2020 from Fortum Recharge AS to Recharge AS.

Recharge is the Nordic region’s largest operator of charging stations for all types of EVs. The company owns almost 1,300 public charging stations and operates a further 1,400 charging stations in Norway, Finland and Sweden. Following the transaction, Fortum’s ownership interest in Recharge will be 37 percent.

The goal is to meet future demand

The Nordic EV market is the most advanced and fastest growing in the world. Consequently, there is a significant demand for public charging infrastructure – for normal charging, fast charging and rapid charging. The purpose of this new partnership is to accelerate Recharge’s growth plans to meet future demand. At the same time, the transaction will free up capital for further growth and development of the services for Fortum’s charging customers.

“We want to offer our customers the best charging solutions on the market.”

Annika Hoffner, CEO of Fortum Recharge AS

“We want to be at the forefront and offer our customers the best charging solutions on the market. By bringing in Infracapital as a strong financial partner, we will be able to increase both the pace of development and the number of charging stations we are to build in the future. It will allow us to take our share of the responsibility for helping society ensure a smooth transition to emission-free EVs both in Norway and abroad,” said Hoffner.

Will build the infrastructure for the emission-free vehicle fleet of the future

“The EV market is growing rapidly, and together with Infracapital, we will build the infrastructure of the future for emission-free road traffic. For Fortum, this is also a success story as it shows the value of the market-leading charging services we have built up in recent years. We want to accelerate the pace of development of our digital services for our existing and future customers,” said Jostein Lindbo, VP of Living & Mobility at Fortum.

“Infracapital is committed to contributing to Europe’s transition to a low-emission society, while also delivering value and sustainable growth for our investors. EVs will obviously play an important role in this transition, and we are pleased to be part of this market, working with Fortum – a leading partner in clean energy with a significant local presence and growth potential,” said Christophe Bordes, Managing Director of Infracapital.

Fortum

Fortum is a leader in clean energy. We provide electricity, heating, cooling and smart solutions that improve resource efficiency. We want our customers and society to join us in our work to advance the transition to a cleaner world. We employ approximately 8,000 energy specialists in the Nordic and Baltic countries, Russia, Poland and India. Our turnover in 2019 was EUR 5.4 billion. Fortum’s shares are listed on Nasdaq Helsinki.

Fortum is a pioneer in charging solutions for EVs in a number of countries, including Norway. The charging network in the Nordic countries consists of 2,500 public charging stations for EVs, with Norway as the largest market.See all our charging stations here.

Infracapital

Infracapital invests in, builds and manages a diverse range of essential infrastructure to meet society’s changing needs and create long-term economic growth. They have worked with 50 companies around Europe and have raised and managed over GBP 6.5 billion through six funds.

Infracapital is part of M&G, a leading European savings and investment firm. M&G manages long-term savings for more than five million people and is a major investor in the UK and in the world economy. Total managed assets amount to GBP 352 billion (31 December 2019).

Contact

Annika Hoffner
CEO of Fortum Recharge AS

+4790 28 46 83
annika.hoffner@rechargeinfra.com